I hired a developer and they now claim they have a copyright on the code, how did this happen?

In this day of a new app being developed every day, how does the company owner or management know who owns the code developed and when they could lose control over it?

Most issues of ownership for software code fall into areas of copyright (a form of intellectual property or IP), since they are usually “written works of authorship” and primarily covered by US copyright law.  Copyright protection provides the author with protection from reproduction by others.  There are times when works can be reproduced without violating a copyright under things such as the “fair-use doctrine,” such as when sample pages from a book are reprinted in a blog with commentary by the blog author about their thoughts or criticisms about what is being said in the book.  The rights for copyright protection are generally given to the original author of the work for long periods of time (anywhere from 70 years to over 120 years depending upon all the facts).  After that amount of time has passed, the work is considered in the public domain and others can copy it without worrying about infringement.

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To Stagger or Not to Stagger Your Board of Directors, That is the Question

One question faced by companies from startup through Fortune 500 status is whether they should stagger or classify their board of directors.  Staggering or classifying occurs when the corporation sets up voting for election of only a minority of members of the board every year, so it often takes several years to replace an entire board.  This is viewed as a good takeover defense and also argued to be good for the corporation because frequent changes of directors can result in corporate policy and corporate governance changing more often or more dramatically. Those against it feel that it doesn’t give shareholders the ability to make major changes when problems arise with the current board’s decisions and it entrenches existing corporate policy and management to not as easily allow for necessary change.  Although some would downplay trying to make this about shareholder rights versus management or existing structure, that is a major factor of the argument.

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Crowdfunding Passed Senate but Reduced By Bill Amendment

H.R. 2930, one part of the multi-bill JOBS Act being pushed through Congress, was to allow more eased securities regulation of so-called crowdfunding.  Some have argued that sites like Kickstarter or others could change their business model (currently only accepts gifts or donations, called pledges, to raise money) to help companies raise money for companies in exchange for stock in that company.  Currently, that model would be prohibited under securities laws as general advertising and public sales of stock are not allowed, especially through an intermediary, with certain exceptions like using a registered broker-dealer or registering the stock with the SEC.

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Insider Trading Crackdown on Congress- STOCK Act | H.R. 1148 S.1871

The Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act (STOCK) has now passed both the U.S. House and Senate and should be signed into law by the president very soon. (Actual Text | Bill Summary & Status) H.R. 1148 or Senate Version S.1871 is the bill that seeks to impose heavier restrictions on insider trading that is done by or is connected to members of congress, federal employees, or employees of congress. Insider trading is covered by the Securities Act of 1934 and other related federal legislation and rules by the SEC and CFTC. It occurs when someone uses inside information as a basis to trade in stocks, commodities, or other types of securities. Inside information is defined as material non-public information. An example would be someone who works for a public company, gains information about something about to happen with that company that has not been disclosed to the public (e.g. significantly increased profits, new products about to be launched, etc.), and trades based upon that information.

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